Coaching FAQs


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  1. I want to explore coaching but have limited professional expense funds. Where can I go?
  2. Does the conference offer any financial support for coaches leading to ICF Certification?
  3. I want to pursue more training (toward certification). Where do I go?
  4. Where can I find a coach?
  5. I would like to apply coach training to my local church setting. What additional resources would you recommend?
  6. How does coaching impact the supervisory relationship? What is in the relationship between coaching and supervising?
  7. How does spiritual direction differ from/complement coaching?
  8. How does counseling differ from/complement coaching?
  9. How does consulting differ from/complement coaching?
  10. How does training differ from/complement coaching?
  11. How does mentoring differ from/complement coaching?
  12. What are my next steps if I want to coach in the Missouri Conference?
  13. What cultural adaptations or expectations need to be considered when coaching across differing cultural/racial/ethnic lines?

 

I want to explore coaching but have limited professional expense funds. Where can I go?

Master Coach, Dr. J. Val Hastings, Coaching4Clergy offers 3 months of coaching through Coaching4Clergy for only $20.00 as a way for you to sample coaching and discover the benefits of coaching in your ministry. Contact: Coaching4Clergy at 1-877-381-2672 or customerservice@coaching4clergy.com.

 

Does the conference offer any financial support for coaches leading to ICF Certification?

Because certification for training is considered continuing education, you can apply certification training to the Board of Ordained Ministry quadrennial continuing education grant. This grant application is intended to assist United Methodist clergy under appointment by the Missouri Conference who participate in valid continuing education events. It is not intended to provide financial assistance for courses and classes needed to meet basic education requirements. Each person currently serving an appointment or on transitional leave in the Missouri Conference is eligible to receive a $900 grant a quadrennial. It can be received all at one time or broken up into segments to equal $900 a quadrennial upon application. Please note, that since coaching itself is a professional expense, you cannot apply this grant to pay/reimburse costs associated with receiving coaching. The grant application is found under “BOM Forms” at www.moumethodist.org/boardofordainedministry.

 

I want to pursue more training (toward certification). Where do I go?

After taking a Basic Coach Training (BCT) course, try out your new skills. This can take place within your own ministry context. If you would like to be considered for coaching throughout the Conference, complete an application* for published (ICF) and unpublished (BCT + experience) lists from the Centers for Pastoral or Congregational Excellence.* To get “credit” for the course through an accredited training program, write a reflection on your BCT experience and email to val@coaching4clergy.com. To learn more, consider Coaching4Clergy’s Professional Coach Training, an Accredited Coach Training Program (ACTP) through the International Coach Federation. More details can be found at coaching4clergy.com.

*Completion of an application does not guarantee employment as a coach in the Conference.

 

Where can I find a coach?

Visit http://www.moumethodist.org/pldcoachbios for the Missouri Conference published (ICF-certified) list from the Centers for Pastoral or Congregational Excellence. Or, you can ask either Center for the unpublished (Basic Coach Training + experience) list. In addition, Discipleship Ministries includes a list of recommended coaches. Clergy Coaching Network also has a list.

 

I would like to apply coach training to my local church setting. What additional resources would you recommend?

You can begin to use the skills learned in Basic Coach Training immediately in your ministry setting. Through deep listening and asking powerful questions, you can transform your approach to discipleship and pastoral ministry. In order to learn more, there are courses specific to group and internal ministry coaching available through Coaching4Clergy like “Coaching Intact Teams and Groups” and “The Ministry Leader as Internal Coach.” Visit their course catalog at Coaching4Clergy.com. There are also book resources to explore at coaching4clergy.com/books.

 

How does coaching impact the supervisory relationship? What is in the relationship between coaching and supervising?

While coaching is often a part of supervising and has the ability to improve your supervisory skills, it can confuse the relationship and potentially cause harm to the coachee/supervisee. Keep in mind what role you are playing and communicate that to the supervised employee. Coaching is all about the coachee. It is transformational versus transactional by tapping into the greatness and giftedness of the person. As a supervisor, there are times when a transactional approach is required (e.g., addressing poor performance or unacceptable behaviors). You may have to say, “I need to take off my coaching hat and put on my supervisor hat for a few moments…”

 

How does spiritual direction differ from/complement coaching?

There is overlap between spiritual direction and coaching. Both are focused on the person receiving the direction or coaching. Coaching is primarily focused on forward movement. Spiritual direction is the practice of being with people as they attempt to deepen their relationship with the divine or to learn and grow in their own personal spirituality. Coaching supports a learner or client in achieving a specific personal or professional goal by providing training, advice and guidance.

 

How does counseling differ from/complement coaching?

While coaching can sometimes feel therapeutic, there are very real differences between the two. Counseling is often times conducted for the use of revisiting one’s past and finding healing from his or her wounds. A lot of work usually has to happen around understanding, healing or accepting before future actions can be considered or effective. The goal of counseling is for clients to recover from their past wounds and move towards a lifestyle of healing, finding freedom from their pain. On the other hand, coaching is a helpful method that looks toward the future. Coaching is for people who desire to see improvement and beneficial change in their lives. Rather than healing from the past, Coaching looks forward and asks the question, “How can we meet your goals?”

 

How does consulting differ from/complement coaching?

The key is that a consultant “tells” the client what to do. Usually a consultant is hired as the “expert,” does an assessment and then makes recommendations as to what needs to be done. Some consultants will give different options and let the client make the choice but some consultants tell the client what they need and must do to reach the stated goals. The key term is that the consultant “tells” the client what to do. After recommendations are made, the consultant is no longer in the picture to assist the client in implementing any changes.

 

How does training differ from/complement coaching?

Like consulting, a trainer “tells” the client what to do. Sometimes training is needed before coaching can be effective or can be a complement to a coaching relationship. Training is used for things like orientation, changes in processes, procedures, or technology. Training is often skill-specific and can be a one-time event. Training is learning focused, provides new knowledge and skills, often takes place with groups, usually structured (with an agenda) and is designed to get someone to do/improve a specific task (e.g., break the 200 weekly worship barrier, new approaches to 21st century evangelism, using social media for outreach and connection).

 

How does mentoring differ from/complement coaching?

Mentoring in the Missouri Conference is specific to the process for licensed or ordained ministry. Often this process is used in the church/ministry setting so that a “more experienced” person can share with and help a “less experienced” person in the life and ministry issues that are faced. The expert is the Mentor since they have been through many experiences themselves and can share their learnings from those experiences. The Mentor can guide the person through the challenges with encouragement, support, prayer, etc., with helpful suggestions of what could or needs to be done.

 

What are my next steps if I want to coach in the Missouri Conference?

Take a Basic Coach Training course or equivalent. Contact the Centers for Pastoral Excellence or Congregational Excellence to determine equivalency. Complete an application for published (ICF-certified) and unpublished (BCT + experience) lists from the Centers for Pastoral or Congregational Excellence. Completion of an application does not guarantee employment as a coach in the Conference.

 

What cultural adaptations or expectations need to be considered when coaching across differing cultural/racial/ethnic lines?

People from different cultures can develop effective coaching relationships. Coaches begin by acknowledging that differing expectations of coaching may exist within a variety of cultural contexts. A person's belief system and experiences can impact how they interact with their coach and achieve goals. As a result, coaching across cultures requires working toward a clear mutual understanding of what coaching is and what the client can expect from the partnership. Additionally, practices of communication, problem solving, and power differential may be contextual. Finally, when language differences exist it is important to be aware of subtleties such as pace and word usage that can cause misunderstanding. The role of the coach is to support the coachee in embracing their diversity and using it as a strength.